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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
in our city. to support the police department and law enforcement system of doing more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it
with hud for instance. one of the items that we have this compliance with applicable laws, federal, state, local. i imagine that would mean that hud is focusing on how federal law is being followed. and that for you to focus would be more than what is happening with local compliance. is that how it would work? >> anything specific to hud, the governing agency, we would leave to them. but i say that sort of looking over not just laws, legal compliance, might be in hud's purview. we would take much more of a focus on the city's priorities. i do know - especially when we talk about policies % there are many city policies and priorities that are different from what hud wants. we would look at that and how it fits together. i say that because i think that there are things about rent collection, tenant eviction policies, housing replacement policies that are important to the city that maybe hud has a different point of view on. >> supervisor campos: supervisor cohen mentioned the issuing of grants, purchasing, contracting. i assume policies around those issues would be things included in your
and police officers, law enforcement. i'm curious what role law enforcement can play in restoretive justice, what can be imparted as groups of people who may or may not be connected with the trauma. once you are traumatized by the school, politicians, et cetera, et cetera, then you have more of these power dynamic things going on in your head, i'm going to exert whatever power i have on these people, i'm interested in hearing about the restoretive power that we want to be part of the change. >> our organization just had a grant to partner with the department of justice to make films on exactly those kinds of things. we're going to be making a film on working with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't going to be bullied so i did it to anyone else. breaking that cycle is g
. they make laws that we have to follow. it gives me great pleasure to introduce the president of the board of supervisors, david chiu. [applause] >> good afternoon. first, if any of you have ever wondered what an ls -- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional security requirements and plans. we pass legislation to give the entertainment commission m
't know if the numbers has gone down or they are obeying the law more. >> you did your job in the '80s. >> the question here, i don't think there has been a lot of dispute over the incidents. there is probably some dispute over the exact happenstance over the more serious incident and therefore, i accept that there has been a number of issues here that warrant some level of penalty. the contrary side to that is the fact that there were some due process issues. one in terms of the 20 days. and i was also not overly impressed by the nature of the hearing process that i read in the transcript. it was not very well-done and i didn't think it was just an issue of language, but what i read into statements. how people were directed. how they were allowed -- and i didn't find it very appropriate to a city agency in terms of how we deal with our citizens, no matter how guilty they may be. so i would probably, based on that, as a counter, and i don't disagree that they have found significant incidents that warrant penalty, but i would reduce the penalty, just because of the due process issues.
and the rest rooms by law, sanitation laws, they do not do, that sir. i can assure you on that. [speaker not understood] the trash half the time. there's been severe harassment of visitors that come to visit a tenant. i've been there five years myself, okay. and just i can move any time i want. there's no law against that. [speaker not understood]. the rent money i'm not receiving services i'm paying for. the elevator keeps breaking down every two weeks. they get it going [speaker not understood]. i know it sounds funny now. it wasn't funny then. the elevator service is ridiculous. they'll get it running and it breaks down two weeks later. and there's a lot of people in wheelchairs, on crutches, seniors, disabled, they have to crawl down the stairs and abandon their wheelchairs in the lobby because they cannot even get down the stairs. some of them live on the fourth floor with me. it's ridiculous. we do not appreciate our visitors and our guests being told by the management that we've been removed or we're not there. it's either that or go the other way, harass them for walking down the
came back after law school. my background for the first few years was as a practicing attorney. i worked in the private sector for a number of years. and then i worked for the city as a deputy city attorney and then became general counsel of the school district of san francisco and through that became involved in politics and at some point decided to run for office. >> you have lived in san francisco for awhile. why did you decide to live here? supervisor campos: i have always felt that san francisco is unique. i have always loved this city. i think that san francisco is -- it represents the best of what this country has to offer. it is a place that welcomes people from all over the world, from all over the country, and is a place that not only tolerates, but actually increases diversity. it is a place that is forward thinking in terms of how it looks at issues, and it has always felt like home. as a gay latino man, i felt this was a place where i could be happy. >> why did you get involved? supervisor campos: i think a lot of the past to do with my being an immigrant. i am very g
francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because he actually knows how and he's the only mayor in city history that can say he actually knows every single city street because his crews probably paved them. i have had the privilege of working alongside ed for many years in city government. he has always been a cherished colleague and friend to everyone in city hall. he's done the job, he gets the job done, never wanting credit, just the satisfaction of doing the right thing for the people he serves in the city and county of san francisco. i was thinking about the introduction of mayor ed lee lastity and we'll taking the time to think about ed as mayor and ed as leader. i've been lucky to know ever
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
within tunisia, they're following the rule of law, and as more evidence becomes available they're fully prepared to act on him again. so i think, you know, as hillary clinton said dramatically, our focus here now is to bring these guys to justice but also to understand benghazi in the context of what's happened in mali recently, what's happened in algeria over the past few days, to understand the evolving throat from al qaeda in the maghreb and to deal appropriately with that. >> dana loesch, there were calls from some people, rand paul and others, that hillary clinton would have been fired over what happened. do you agree with that? >> i do agree with that. i think senator paul was correct in his claims today and how he addressed secretary of state clinton. there were a lot of -- there were a lot of missteps here. we do know -- you had said that there was a whisper of misogyny in questioning ambassador -- or susan rice and then secretary of state clinton. i don't think asking questions as to who gave the orders to stand down or asking why talking points were changed -- i mean, we absol
to avoid a law that said he couldn't -- go join a lobbying firm until five years after his term expired. well, he quit early just to avoid that law. so now he's out there, he says 70 years old, and he just went back to work and he's going to work. host: we got this from cnn politics, got this online. gop senators push for term limits is the headline. a handful of republican senators have proposed a constitutional amendment to limit how long a person may serve in congress. currently there are no term limits for federal lawmakers. but senator jim demint and several of his colleagues advocating service in the senate be limited to 12 years while lawmakers would only be allowed to serve six years in the house. this is an effort that was put forth two years ago. americans, they say, no real change in washington will never half until we end the era of permanent politicians, demint said in a statement released by his office. as long as members have the chance to spend their lives in washington, their interests will will always skew towards spending taxpayer dollars to buy off special interests
conditions. and i have a couple of questions, first of all i want to say that ignorance of the law is no excuse. and you have been in business nine years at that location and for nine years you have needed an extended hours permit. also, you can't blame your employees for not acting right because the buck stops with the managers and the employer. and you have to take responsibility for that. and if you have a beer and wine license, which is an abc permit, you are not supposed to let intoxicated people into your place. that is... it is just you are not supposed to, period. as long as you have a license. having said that, i wanted to ask you about three notices of violation that you got dated october 16th, and noticing that you were in violation of 1060 and 1070, where a permit is required and also, noise ordinance. and then, you had another one and you continued to operate even though you were given a notice of violation. and you got another notice of violation on november 11th. at 2:30 in the morning and also a violation of 1070.1 which is the extended hours permit and you continue
're focused on ammunition and immediate interruption in the behavior that law enforcement advises us and sees every day that leads to more violence. in the weeks and months to come, the board and the mayor's office will be introducing both more ideas and legislation and resolutions to support federal and state efforts in the same direction. at the same time, we'll also be introducing through our budget support for an ongoing organizing in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it
whether the union broke the law during a strike, whether the employer broke the law during a unionization, andnow the labor board has really gotten very involved in setting rules for employer os on social media, when can employers tell their employees what they can do in social media and what they can't. and basically the effect of today's ruling would nullify a lot of watching what nlb has done over the past year if the supreme court upholds it. >> so what were the problems that the judges in the district court have? >> the judges-- the judges said that the recess, the recess appoint oments by president obama last january were illegal. the president said that the senate was actually out for a break. and that he was allowed to make these recess appointments. the senate said, the republicans in the senate said it was not a real break. that they were continuing to have pro forma sessions and they maintained it was illegal for the president to make these appointments. and today the three judge panel ruled that the president recess appointments during intrasessions were illegal. the court rea
whether the union broke the law during a strike whether the employer broke the law during a unionization andnow the labor board has really gotten very involved in setting rules for employer os on social media when can employers tell their employees what they can do in social media and what they can't. and basically the effect of today's ruling would nullify a lot of watching what nlb has done over the past year if the supreme court upholds it. >> so what were the problems that the judges in the district court have? >> the judges-- the judges said that the recess the recess appoint oments by president obama last january were illegal. the president said that the senate was actually out for a break. and that he was allowed to make these recess appointments. the senate said the republicans in the senate said it was not a real break. that they were continuing to have pro forma sessions and they maintained it was illegal for the president to make these appointments. and today the three judge panel ruled that the president recess appointments during intrasessions were illegal. the court really
in temple hills yesterday. plus, is there a law requiring you to shovel your sidewalk after this snow? and how long is the flu contagious? liz crenshaw has the answers for us in this week's "ask liz." first up, liz, fire officials want us to warn people tonight about those space heaters in homes. is there a way to use them and use them safely? >> yeah, the problem with space heaters is they are a problem with safety. consumer products safety commission tells us that yesterday's fire on kurtis drive in temple hills is more than 1,000 fires sparked by portable electric heaters each year. that started when they left the heater unattended. remember, to turn off your space heaters when you leave the room or when you go to sleep. put your heater on a hard surface, not on a rug or carpet. and keep it away from beds or sofas. also, never plug a heater into an extension cord and make sure you have working smoke detectors and a carbon monoxide detector in your home, as well. >> so important. next question from patrick in northwest d.c. patrick wants to know, liz, is there a law that requires ho
apart and for the ones kept apart by, laws and prejudices. for the spare rows and the humming birds and for the weeds and the hararas and for the women of gaza. for the one tortured in the darkness. for the refugees wrapped in barbed wire. for each and every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for shelter, for every human being who sleeps tonight out in the rain. for the child with nostalgia to be born, for every child to get home safe. for the elderly alone, for the worldwide end of hate, disease, and poverty. for a just world still to come, where no one goes hungry and the water is clean. and prisons are outlawed and schools are free. and exciting. and poetry, mandatory. for police and politicians. for the indians of the amazon and for the jaquar faced for extinction and for the battle to stop and for every last gun to be forged into a pen, and for the most hopeless, hopeless in the world, those without even dreams to get by. here there is 100, 10,000 origamis waiting for you, floating in the rainbow of hope >> thank you. >> san francisco poet, that was moving. >> okay
asfreedoeeh .. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant [ m [ale ane unceun]] when heit co s tos he he financianal obs oacleac milimitary armilimi fa f, , w e undunstanst ou r finaficialcidvicdv is igearedarpecpeicalic to cuo rrenten and fndmer mely y membemrs and aheirheamiaes.s [ laughaus ]] dad! ! dad!ad [ applappuse ]e [ mal me annoancerce life br ings ogstacltas. usaua brinbr ret remee adv . call orl visitiss os ine.n usaua brinbr ret remee adv . we'wre ree y toy elp.l usaua brinbr ret remee adv . learnea more orwith othr f usaa raetiremirt gut e. e usaua brinbr ret remee adv . call 87l 7-242-24aa.aa usaua brinbr ret remee adv . >> and in case you're wondering what's closed today. federa
in seattle, went to college in maine, this tiny college out there. he decided to come back and get his law degree from uc-berkeley, and then was appointed by art agnos in government in 1979. he became the director of the human rights commission under willie brown. he became the director of public works. 2005 city administrator, and then the fateful day in january 2011 when the board of supervisors could not decide on anybody and decided that family was not going to be a threat to their future political aspirations. [laughter] he got more than six votes, six more than anyone else. and he became the interim mayor. he did an amazing job. he is outspoken, both feet on the ground, a person you can trust, a person who is very honest, and based upon his experience, knows how to get the job done. i believe he is the best player ever that san francisco has had. we are so lucky to have him up there. he has balanced the budget, reform pensions, created jobs, and mayor, it has been a pleasure to work with you. i look forward to working with you further. they san francisco transplant coming down here t
and state law as round this issue. expanding the sidewalks and allowing for merchants to sell their important goods is such an important process to bring those two together. we're also looking at the bicyclists and pedestrians and walkers and those using transit to ensure safe passage through this new year's celebration. i want to thank the merchants specifically in terms of bringing this idea forward and working with the city departments to ensure that we have a wonderful new year's in chinatown. thank you so much. [ applause ] >> and stockton corridor, mayor bus corridor, mayor major work to ensure that they run on time and a huge partner mta, ed reiskin is not here, but bond yee is here as they were last year. bond, would you come up and say a few years, please.&good morning everyone. on behalf of my colleague as the sfmta, we need the cooperation of everyone, pedestrians, merchants, the motorists and everyone else who uses the streets. so looking forward to another successful two weeks. happy new year. [ applause ] >> thank you, bond. as you heard, it's a huge partnersh
we have with mayor lee. for many of you, probably know this since the day he was in law school, representing tenants in chinatown, to make sure their living conditions were what they needed to be, he has been there from the very beginning and from the day and well before, no one had to explain to ed lee what affordable housing was for or why it mattered or what was important about it or why you needed to support it? so we have done something unbelievable in san francisco this past year under his leadership; which is despite the fact that the state has seen fit to remove literally a billion dollars in affordable housing funding from the dissolution of redevelopment agencies, no other mayor, no other board of supervisors stood up and said we're going to change the story. so with our board's leadership and with the mayor's leadership and with the support of many donors and many committed political folks, we passed an unbelievable measure that will provide funding for affordable housing here in san francisco. it doesn't solve the problem, but it is a step way beyond what any othe
meeting today with law enforcement officials from three communities rocked by gun violence. new tossen police chief michael kehoe along with his counter parts from aurora, colorado and oak creek wisconsin where a gunman killed six people and wounded four others at a sikh temple in august. u.s. attorney general eric holder and homeland security secretary janet napolitano will be sitting in as they have in many of the meetings that vice president biden had been holding along the way. also representatives from the major city's chiefs and major sheriff's associations. s the conversations continue as congress gets ready to start weighing the white house's recommendations for gun control measures and members of both chambers have introduced legislation to ban assault weapons and put limitations on high-capacity magazines. also, the senate judiciary committee is set to hold its first hearings on the measures on wednesday. >>> president obama also welcoming the miami heat to the white house today to congratulate them on their 2012 nba championship. had to give a little plug for the home team t
it. >> reporter: the last time congress attempted to overhaul the nation's immigration laws was in 2007. the bill pushed by president george w. bush went down in flames after republicans argued it amounted to amnesty for illegal immigrants. gop senator john mccain says things will be different this time. >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons, and we've got to understand that. >> this plan would enable illegal immigrants who have no criminal background to gain temporary legal status so they could stay in the country even as they get on the back of the line for citizenship. it would also allow highly skilled foreign workers like engineers to be able to get visas to come to this country more easily. the white house says the president is pleased with the proposal, and he's going to be making his case for comprehensive immigration reform in a speech in las vegas tomorrow. norah and charlie? >> nancy
] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonderhat other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. jon: an incredible story out of michigan where two kids who were home alone answered a knock at the door and turned into heroes. watch. >> i opened the door and she asked me, my parents are home. i told them no. she said, well a guy just kidnapped me, was going to try to kill me. jon: even though they were putting their lives at risk, they let in the 22-year-old college student. she told them she got away from her kidnapper by jumping out of a moving car. the kids locked the door and all hid in the bathroom. police say the guy she was apparently running from showed up
. even though there are shares in london, samsung's own website it is against the law for u.s. residents it buy them. i swear. i thought we were with south korea. ashley: you think. tracy: what alternatives are there? let's bring in a senior analyst at susquehanna. i want to own the shares outright. is there any way for me to do this? >> i think there are some online brokerage firms that may offer you the opportunity to be able to buy stocks in the local korean market. other than that there is no other way. unless you consider buying etfs. there is one etf in particular, ewy, with 25% exposure to samsung. and that's one of the few etfs that are out there for people in the u.s. that could benefit, have some exposure to samsung's success story. ashley: want to talk about the success of samsung. i know it operates in a lot more markets than apple does, but you could argue that is good news for apple because it gives a lot of room for growth for apple products. so which way do you look at that? i mean apple certainly has high-end market. does it need to reduce the cost of products in order t
in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's exactly how harvey felt. now, after the march i learned that malan had refused to go into the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)

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